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Ville de Montréal

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Guillaume Lachapelle

L'attente

2009
Presentation of the artwork
In the centre of the former picnic area of Belmont Park, a lone bumper car is confined in an aluminum enclosure obviously too small to hold it. The structure is topped with a finial adorned with miniature roller coaster, on which two building façades, made of brass and bronze, seem to serve as cars. The playful artwork deploys figurative elements in order to illustrate the former function of the site and underline the importance that it had in the neighbourhood.

Standing alone in this vast space, L’attente nostalgically re-creates the past with a play on scale, time, and absence. The small pavilion circumscribes the bumper car in a way that accentuates the irrelevance of the object when it is isolated. In addition, the contrast of proportions is accentuated by the presence of the model-sized ride, reminding us that the sculpture’s relevance is related above all to its symbolic function. The buildings reflect the real estate developments in the vicinity, underlining the fact that today’s Belmont Park is much smaller than the amusement park that preceded it.

Finally, the composition as a whole acts as a metonymic reminder that encourages the viewer to reconstruct what the sculpture cannot portray. In Lachapelle’s view, “The artwork becomes the expression of friction between reality and a fantasy world, a difficult encounter between desires and constraints.” 1

1. Guillaume Lachapelle, project submission, 2008 (our translation).
Associated events
The artwork pays tribute to Belmont Park, the amusement park in Cartierville in operation from 1923 to 1983. During the course of its existence, the legendary site welcomed more than 25 million visitors and offered entertainment and emotional experiences for the entire family, and its memory lives on in the hearts of Montréalers. L’attente was a public commission by the Ville de Montréal marking the 25th anniversary of the park’s closure.
Guillaume Lachapelle
Guillaume Lachapelle earned his bachelor’s degree in visual arts at the Université du Québec à Montréal in 1998. Since then, a number of his exhibitions have been well received by the critics, including En pure perte (2009) and Machinations (2010). Lachapelle is also a props master and set sculptor for television, movie, and stage productions. He produced L’attente, his first work of public art, in 2009.
Presentation of the artwork
In the centre of the former picnic area of Belmont Park, a lone bumper car is confined in an aluminum enclosure obviously too small to hold it. The structure is topped with a finial adorned with miniature roller coaster, on which two building façades, made of brass and bronze, seem to serve as cars. The playful artwork deploys figurative elements in order to illustrate the former function of the site and underline the importance that it had in the neighbourhood.

Standing alone in this vast space, L’attente nostalgically re-creates the past with a play on scale, time, and absence. The small pavilion circumscribes the bumper car in a way that accentuates the irrelevance of the object when it is isolated. In addition, the contrast of proportions is accentuated by the presence of the model-sized ride, reminding us that the sculpture’s relevance is related above all to its symbolic function. The buildings reflect the real estate developments in the vicinity, underlining the fact that today’s Belmont Park is much smaller than the amusement park that preceded it.

Finally, the composition as a whole acts as a metonymic reminder that encourages the viewer to reconstruct what the sculpture cannot portray. In Lachapelle’s view, “The artwork becomes the expression of friction between reality and a fantasy world, a difficult encounter between desires and constraints.” 1

1. Guillaume Lachapelle, project submission, 2008 (our translation).
Associated events
The artwork pays tribute to Belmont Park, the amusement park in Cartierville in operation from 1923 to 1983. During the course of its existence, the legendary site welcomed more than 25 million visitors and offered entertainment and emotional experiences for the entire family, and its memory lives on in the hearts of Montréalers. L’attente was a public commission by the Ville de Montréal marking the 25th anniversary of the park’s closure.
Guillaume Lachapelle
Guillaume Lachapelle earned his bachelor’s degree in visual arts at the Université du Québec à Montréal in 1998. Since then, a number of his exhibitions have been well received by the critics, including En pure perte (2009) and Machinations (2010). Lachapelle is also a props master and set sculptor for television, movie, and stage productions. He produced L’attente, his first work of public art, in 2009.
Detail
Category
Fine Arts
Subcategory
Sculpture
Collection name
Public art
Date completed
2009
Mode of acquisition:
Public commission from the Ville de Montréal (competition by public notice)
Accession date
January 26 2009
Technique(s)
Assembled; welded; screwed
Materials
Aluminum; concrete; brass; bronze
General dimensions
411 x 258 x 258 cm
Manufacturer
  • Bernard, Claude / Formaviva Inc.
  • Ladouceur, Jacques / Conception & réalisation JL Enr.
  • Fonderie d'art d'Inverness Inc.
  • Ménard, François
  • Thyssenkrupp Materials
  • C.F.F. Speciality Metals
  • Ancrage canadiens Hegedus Ltée
  • Industries Desormeau Inc.
  • Cintube Ltée
  • Terramex
L'attente
Borough
Ahuntsic-Cartierville
Park
Parc Belmont