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Art Public

Ville de Montréal

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Shirley Witebsky

Sans titre

1964
Presentation of the artwork
Sitting on a limestone base is a monolithic dolomite sculpture composed of curved reliefs integrated with a centre perforated in four places. The relatively small work seems discreet and delicate in this part of Mount Royal Park, which is dominated by many large sculptures.

It is not for its dimensions that Witebsky’s sculpture stands out. Instead, the organic nature of its rounded forms creates a sense of closeness and intimacy that encourages introspection in the viewer. In addition, the piece’s sinuous silhouette exudes sensuality.

Interestingly, the sculpture was created as the result of an unforeseen event. At the last minute, it was announced that the representative from the United States would not be present at the symposium, and this gave Witebsky, who was married to participant Krishna Reddy, the opportunity to take part unofficially in the event. She was also the only female artist to participate.
Associated events
Witebsky’s artwork was executed for the International Sculpture Symposium in Montréal (1964), the first time a symposium was held in North America. The goals of this concept, created a few years earlier in Europe, were to have artists create monumental sculptures in a context of encounters with the public and to provide public spaces with international-calibre artworks. Instigated by sculptor Robert Roussil, this symposium gathered 11 sculptors from nine countries and attracted more than 40,000 visitors. It was seen as one of the events that brought Québec into artistic and cultural modernity.
Shirley Witebsky
An American sculptor and printmaker born in Minneapolis, Shirley Witebsky (1925–66) went to university in her hometown; in 1952, she went to Paris, where she studied with Stanley Hayter at Atelier 17. There, she met her husband, Krishna Reddy, with whom she went to Montréal in 1964 for the International Sculpture Symposium.

Her prints are in the collections of the California State University at Long Beach and Oregon State University, among others.
Presentation of the artwork
Sitting on a limestone base is a monolithic dolomite sculpture composed of curved reliefs integrated with a centre perforated in four places. The relatively small work seems discreet and delicate in this part of Mount Royal Park, which is dominated by many large sculptures.

It is not for its dimensions that Witebsky’s sculpture stands out. Instead, the organic nature of its rounded forms creates a sense of closeness and intimacy that encourages introspection in the viewer. In addition, the piece’s sinuous silhouette exudes sensuality.

Interestingly, the sculpture was created as the result of an unforeseen event. At the last minute, it was announced that the representative from the United States would not be present at the symposium, and this gave Witebsky, who was married to participant Krishna Reddy, the opportunity to take part unofficially in the event. She was also the only female artist to participate.
Associated events
Witebsky’s artwork was executed for the International Sculpture Symposium in Montréal (1964), the first time a symposium was held in North America. The goals of this concept, created a few years earlier in Europe, were to have artists create monumental sculptures in a context of encounters with the public and to provide public spaces with international-calibre artworks. Instigated by sculptor Robert Roussil, this symposium gathered 11 sculptors from nine countries and attracted more than 40,000 visitors. It was seen as one of the events that brought Québec into artistic and cultural modernity.
Shirley Witebsky
An American sculptor and printmaker born in Minneapolis, Shirley Witebsky (1925–66) went to university in her hometown; in 1952, she went to Paris, where she studied with Stanley Hayter at Atelier 17. There, she met her husband, Krishna Reddy, with whom she went to Montréal in 1964 for the International Sculpture Symposium.

Her prints are in the collections of the California State University at Long Beach and Oregon State University, among others.
Detail
Variation of title
Non titrée (SISM-64)
Category
Fine Arts
Subcategory
Sculpture
Collection name
Public art
Date completed
1964
Mode of acquisition:
Purchase
Accession date
March 23 1966
Technique(s)
Sculpted
Materials
Limestone
General dimensions
197 x 102 x 84 cm
Sans titre
Borough
Ville-Marie
Park
Parc du Mont-Royal