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Ville de Montréal

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Lucie Duval

À la croisée des mots

2004
Presentation of the artwork
This “tree-sculpture,” as the artist calls it, is composed of four steel poles around which a horizontally deployed spiral, also made of steel beams, unfurls a series of words. The words chosen by Duval, and executed in aluminum painted red, orange, and yellow, are “globe,” “exposition,” “octave,” “route,” “gamma,” “ellipse,” “solstice,” “variation,” “art,” “nature,” “image,” “escapade,” and “relation.” Creating a colourful whirlpool, these words form, out of order, an acrostic that pays tribute to Georges Vanier. The artwork thus refers to the cultural centre bearing the name in front of which it is installed. Readable in both English and French, the words are dedicated to the residents of the Little Burgundy neighbourhood who, for more than a century, have formed a cultural and linguistic mosaic. The artwork highlights the presence of the cultural centre in the urban space, and at the same time it symbolically combines the various functions of this heritage site (library, exhibition space, and cultural centre).

Words are an essential aspect of Duval’s work. When she contextualizes them or puts them in relation with objects and images, words become a material that is poetic and highly meaningful.
Associated events
A public art competition was organized in 2004, in the context of restoration of the Centre culturel Georges-Vanier to mark the building’s centenary. Originally, the building was the town hall of Sainte-Cunégonde, and it later contained the first French-language public library in Canada. In 1985, the building was named after Georges Vanier in honour of the diplomat and military man, born nearby, who was the first Francophone governor-general of Canada.
Lucie Duval
Lucie Duval is a graduate of the École supérieure des beaux-arts de Toulouse. She had a major exhibition at the Musée d’art contemporain de Baie-Saint-Paul in 2010. She was represented in the exhibition Femmes artistes: l’éclatement des frontières, 1965-2000, at the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec in 2010, and in De fougue et de passion, at the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal in 1997–98. She has produced a number of artworks integrated with architecture, including Mots choisis (2002), at the CLSC d’Hochelaga-Maisonneuve, and Traversée (1998), at the Pavillon J.A.-DeSève at the Université du Québec à Montréal.
Presentation of the artwork
This “tree-sculpture,” as the artist calls it, is composed of four steel poles around which a horizontally deployed spiral, also made of steel beams, unfurls a series of words. The words chosen by Duval, and executed in aluminum painted red, orange, and yellow, are “globe,” “exposition,” “octave,” “route,” “gamma,” “ellipse,” “solstice,” “variation,” “art,” “nature,” “image,” “escapade,” and “relation.” Creating a colourful whirlpool, these words form, out of order, an acrostic that pays tribute to Georges Vanier. The artwork thus refers to the cultural centre bearing the name in front of which it is installed. Readable in both English and French, the words are dedicated to the residents of the Little Burgundy neighbourhood who, for more than a century, have formed a cultural and linguistic mosaic. The artwork highlights the presence of the cultural centre in the urban space, and at the same time it symbolically combines the various functions of this heritage site (library, exhibition space, and cultural centre).

Words are an essential aspect of Duval’s work. When she contextualizes them or puts them in relation with objects and images, words become a material that is poetic and highly meaningful.
Associated events
A public art competition was organized in 2004, in the context of restoration of the Centre culturel Georges-Vanier to mark the building’s centenary. Originally, the building was the town hall of Sainte-Cunégonde, and it later contained the first French-language public library in Canada. In 1985, the building was named after Georges Vanier in honour of the diplomat and military man, born nearby, who was the first Francophone governor-general of Canada.
Lucie Duval
Lucie Duval is a graduate of the École supérieure des beaux-arts de Toulouse. She had a major exhibition at the Musée d’art contemporain de Baie-Saint-Paul in 2010. She was represented in the exhibition Femmes artistes: l’éclatement des frontières, 1965-2000, at the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec in 2010, and in De fougue et de passion, at the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal in 1997–98. She has produced a number of artworks integrated with architecture, including Mots choisis (2002), at the CLSC d’Hochelaga-Maisonneuve, and Traversée (1998), at the Pavillon J.A.-DeSève at the Université du Québec à Montréal.
Detail
Variation of title
arbre-sculpture
Category
Fine Arts
Subcategory
Installation
Collection name
Public art
Date completed
2004
Mode of acquisition:
Public commission from the Ville de Montréal
Accession date
August 29 2004
Technique(s)
Anodized aluminum sheets; cut out; welded
Materials
Galvanized steel, anodized aluminum
General dimensions
732 x 300 cm
Manufacturer
  • Duchaine, Paul
  • Transformation Éclipse Inc.
À la croisée des mots
Borough
Le Sud-Ouest
Building
Centre Georges-Vanier
Civic address
2450 Rue Workman Montréal, Qc